MIA: History: USA: Culture: Publications: The Liberator & The Workers Monthly

The Liberator


First Published: 1918 - 1924
Source: Original copies of The Liberator from Tim Davenport (Eugene, OR.), Riazanov Library Project (San Pablo, CA) and the Holt Labor Library (San Franicisco)
Transcription/Markup: Brian Baggins 2006. Main page redone by Tim Davenport and David Walters in 2009
Digitization: Of new PDF run, 2012-13: Marty Goodman, The Riazanov Library Project, San Pablo, CA and Brooklyn, NY
Public Domain: USA History Archive 2006. This work is completely free. This work is in the Public Domain under the Creative Commons Common Deed. You can freely copy, distribute and display this work; as well as make derivative and commercial works. Please credit the Marxists Interent Archive as your source, include the url to this work, and note any of the transcribers, editors & proofreaders above.


Go Directly to The Liberator table of contents

Introduction to The Liberator collection

The Liberator, arguably the greatest radical magazine ever produced in America, began in the spring of 1918 as a successor to the New York left wing political, artistic, and literary magazine The Masses, which had been effectively terminated by postal censorship and Justice Department prosecution during World War I. Masses editor Max Eastman and his sister Crystal, a fine journalist and leading feminist of the day, determined to carry forward the Masses project in new clothes. The pair hoped to escape the political controversy which had handicapped and sunk its predecessor by launching a revised, smaller-format magazine with a new name.

The change of name did not mean a change of political orientation, however. As with The Masses, The Liberator continued to support various tendencies of the socialist movement, gradualist to revolutionary. The publication supported the labor movement in all its forms, remaining partial to the syndicalist Industrial Workers of the World, but still providing coverage to all radical elements in the labor movement, including those guiding independent unions such as the Amalgamated Garment Workers and those working to radicalize the American Federation of Labor.

The Liberator’s international news coverage was first-rate. Legendary war correspondent and Communist Labor Party founder John Reed reported the ongoing situation in Soviet Russia; major reports were filed from across tumultuous post-war Europe by Robert Minor, Hiram K. Moderwell, Frederick Kuh, and Crystal Eastman. Pivotal conventions of political parties and labor unions were covered in depth by intelligent participants. The great political trials of the day were reported in detail with perception. Speeches and articles by the great revolutionary leaders of the world found space on its pages. Nearly a century after the fact, The Liberator remains an essential primary source for the political history of its era.

As with The Masses, The Liberator relied heavily upon political art, including contributions from some of the finest talents of the day. Among the artistic worthies who graced the publication’s pages were Art Young, Robert Minor, Lydia Gibson, Boardman Robinson, William Gropper, Maurice Becker, J.J. Lankes, and Fred Ellis. Each color cardstock cover of The Liberator was unique and distinctive, a miniature work of art, again echoing its illustrious predecessor. Poetry and fiction fleshed out its pages, including work by Carl Sandburg, Claude McKay, Arturo Giovannitti, and others. The magazine was, in short, a monthly intellectual banquet for the American radical intelligentsia, available on newsstands for just two thin dimes.

Maintaining a low cost of the elaborate publication for its readers came at a huge price, however. To economize, ultra-thin newsprint was used for the magazine’s pages — cheap and terrible, high in acid content. The result was predictable, a publication as fragile and ephemeral as a spring wildflower. Nine decades after the fact, the few surviving copies of The Liberator, (particularly from the years 1918-1922) are inevitably browning and brittle, whisked by worried librarians from the general stacks of research libraries into the far less accessible special collections departments. Thus a great irony: the most important of American radical magazines of the early 1920s, The Liberator, is at the same time among the least readily available.

The Liberator ran into trouble in 1922 — both financial and motivational, as editor Max Eastman’s interests shifted from the mundane work of editing to book writing. Eastman ceded his editorial blue pencil around the first of January 1922, with literary critic Floyd Dell taking over the job.Throughout 1922 political matters were somewhat deemphasized in favor of art and culture under Dell’s watch. When finances became tight that year, the underground Communist Party of America moved to fill the void, working with Eastman, Dell, and the core of writers behind the magazine towards a friendly takeover of the publication effective in October of that same year. After the fall of 1922, The Liberator emerged as the de facto official organ of the CPA and its “Legal Political Party” sibling, the Workers Party of America — maintaining a similar graphic style and orientation toward fiction, albeit with a noticeable ideological narrowing of political content. Long articles began to be published by prominent Communist leaders, including C.E. Ruthenberg, John Pepper, William Z. Foster, Jay Lovestone, and Max Bedacht. Former anarchist turned Communist true believer Robert Minor served as editor during this period, assisted by Joseph Freeman as an associate editor in charge of literary material.

In 1924 The Liberator was merged with the Workers Party’s “Trade Union Educational League” magazine, The Labor Herald, and its “Friends of Soviet Russia” monthly, Soviet Russia Pictorial, to form a new publication. This new magazine, The Workers Monthly, was fundamentally similar to the 1923-24 vintage Liberator and continued as the Workers Party’s de facto theoretical journal until 1927, at which time it was given a new form and title as, The Communist. This magazine continues today, known since 1946 as Political Affairs.

Simultaneously, a new large format artistic-political monthly reminiscent of the original Masses (known as, appropriately enough, The New Masses) was launched by the Communist Party in May 1926. This publication carried The Liberator’s torch forward for another decade before gradually morphing into a plain paper newsweekly akin to The Nation or The New Republic. The New Masses was merged with the party general interest monthly Mainstream in January of 1948 to form Masses and Mainstream, a publication vaguely similar in format to Reader’s Digest, albeit with Communist political content.

Addendums & Updates to this 2009 Introduction


[We provide two versions of each issue of The Liberator. One is a viewing version which is digitized at a lower resolution suitable for excellent viewing on your computer. We also provide a version that is of a higher resolution that allows for the high quality printing of the issue, digital archiving on your own hard drive and maximum zoom with you PDF view. The size of each of the files is given after the link for it.]

Important Note: The tables of contents displayed for each issue are highly truncated version of the contents for each issue. They represent only the most important articles and do not reflect the full contents. This will, over time, be corrected. Suffice for now that the table of contents you see below for The Liberator give only a taste of what is inside each issue.


Technical data for those interesting in scanning questions

Text-only pages: In both the low and high res files, these are rendered using 400 dpi 1 bit BW.

Charcoal Sketches: Sometimes 400 dpi 1 bit BW for view / lo-res files. More often 600 dpi 1 bit BW. 600 or 1200 dpi 1 bit BW for printer / hi res versions.

Grayish art requiring gray scale: 200, 260, or 300 dpi 8 bit gray scale for view lo res files. Depending on how much I need to keep file size down. 600 dpi 8 bit gray scale for printer / hi res files.

Color Covers: 300 dpi 24 bit color for view / lo res files. 600 dpi 24 bit color for printer / hi res files.

When Color is used in text or boarders for inside front, inside back, or back cover: Mostly 300 dpi, sometimes 266 or 240 or 200 dpi 24 bit color, for view / lo res files. 400 dpi 24 bit color for the printer / hi res files. For most issues I provide BOTH a 400 dpi 1 bit BW scan AND a color scan of inside front, inside back and back covers that have minor use of color.

Why is single bit BW scanning used predominately in this digital archive? . . . To find out, go to the full Notes on the scanning of The Liberator

—Marty Goodman


The Liberator

Go to the The Liberator Index

1918

Jump to The Liberator for: 1918 | 1919 | 1920 | 1921 | 1922 | 1923

 

Issue No. 1, March, 1918
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TABLE OF CONTENTS:
  • Cover, Artwork of Man in Orange and Black, Sowing Orange Seeds Against Yellow Background, by Hugo Gellert – 1
  • [Ad for Rand School of Social Science] – 2
  • Editor’s Page – 3
  • A Case of Heresy (cartoon), by Art Young – 4
  • The Editorials, by Max Eastman – 5 to 10
  •     Their Utmost Hope – 5
        Attacking the Administration – 5
        The Russian Dictators – 6
        Charles M. Schwab – 6
        A Militant Suffrage Victory – 7
        The Triumph of Karl Marx – 7
        Art in the War – 8
        A World’s Peace – 8 to 10
  • Anniversary (poem), by Arturo Giovannitti – 10
  • O Lord, control my appetite if you must (cartoon) – 11
  • The One-Arm Patriot, by Howard Brubaker – 11
  • The Revolt of the Flesh, by Elizabeth Irons Folsom – 12
  • Church Sociable (poem), by Jean Starr Untermeyer – 12
  • In Behalf of the IWW, by Helen Keller – 13
  • Red Russia the Triumph of the Bolsheviki, by John Reed – 14 to 21
  • Good-bye dear, and do try to make a . . . (cartoon), by Cornelia Barns – 17
  • Isadora Duncan (poem), by Max Eastman – 21
  • An Interruption (cartoon), by Boardman Robinson – 22 to 23
  • Poor Ed   A Story by Susan Glaspell – 24 to 26, 28 to 29
  • An East Indian Dancer (drawing), by Maurice Sterne – 27
  • The Peril of Tom Mooney, by Robert Minor – 29 to 31
  • Will You Let Them Do It? (cartoon), by Robert Minor – 30
  • Two Sonnets,  by Louis Untermeyer – 31
  •     The Pilgrimage – 31
        Windy Days – 31
  • Books [reviews] – 32 to 36
  •    [Fifty Years and Other Poems, by James Weldon Johnson], by FD – 32 to 33
     Trotzky [The Bolsheviki and World Peace, by Leon Trotsky], by Floyd Dell – 33 to 34
     Marching Men [Marching Men, A Novel, by Sherwood Anderson], by Dorothy Day – 34 to 35
     My Political Ideals [Political Ideals, by Bertrand Russell], by Floyd Dell – 35 to 36
  • A Word for Profiteers [no author] – 37
  • Liberator Book Shop – 38 to 39
  • The Family Pew (poem), by Mary MacMillan – 40
  • Little Daughter of the Streets (poem), by Ruth Truk – 40
  • On the Roof (poem), by Leonard Larson Cline – 41
  • Sea Moths (poem), by Margaretta Schuyler – 41
  • The Coolie Ship (poem), by Elizabeth Coatsworth – 41
  • Love Need Have Nothing Else to Do (poem), by Annette Wynne – 41
  • The Marsh (poem), by Nann Clark Barr – 41
  • Intelligent Diplomacy, by Norman Hapgood in the New Republic – 42
  • [Advertisements] – 42
  • [Back Cover, yellow background, John Reed photo] – 43

 

Issue No. 1, March, 1918
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  • “In Behalf of the IWW” — Helen Keller — pg. 13.
  • “Red Russia” [part 1] — John Reed — pp. 14-21.
  • “The Peril of Tom Mooney” — Robert Minor — pp. 29-31.
  • Review of Trotsky’s The Bolsheviki and World Peace — Floyd Dell — pp. 33-34.

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Issue No. 2, April, 1918
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Issue No. 3, May, 1918
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  • “On the Inside” — William D. Haywood — pp. 15-16.
  • “Wilson and the World’s Future” — Max Eastman — pp. 19-24.
  • “Red Russia” [part 3] — John Reed — pp. 28-34.

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Issue No. 4, June, 1918
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  • “The Masses Case” — Max Eastman — pp. 5-6.
  • “The Story of the Trial” — Floyd Dell — pp. 7-18.
  • “Speeches of Max Eastman and Morris Hillquit at the Masses Dinner, May 9” — pp. 19-21..
  • “The Masses Jury” — Max Eastman — pp. 22-23.
  • “A Message to Our Readers from John Reed Who Has Just Returned from Petrograd” — pp. 25-26.
  • “Foreign Affairs” — John Reed — pp. 27-29.
  • “What the Negro is Doing for Himself” — James Weldon Johnson — pp. 29-31.

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Issue No. 5, July, 1918
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  • “Selecting a Perfect Jury” — Arturo Giovannitti — pp. 8-10.
  • “Spring Comes Again” — Vera Buch — pp. 10-11.
  • “Recognize Russia” — John Reed — pp. 18-20.
  • “Labor and the War” — Morris Hillquit — pp. 21-22.
  • “Kerensky is Coming!” — John Reed — pp. 23-27.
  • “Norman Hapgood and Socialist Journalism” — Max Eastman — pg. 28.
  • Letter to Norman Hapgood from John Reed, June 4, 1918. — pp. 28-29.

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Issue No. 6, August, 1918
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  • “Were You Ever a Child?” [Part 1] — Floyd Dell — pp. 5-10.
  • “Recognize the Soviets” — George V. Lomonossoff — pp. 11-13.
  • “Socialists and Suppression” — Arturo Giovannitti — pp. 13-14.
  • “How the Russian Revolution Works” — John Reed — pp. 16-21.
  • “Impressions of the AF of L Convention” — Symposium by “T.L.M.”, “H.M.”, Crystal Eastman — pp. 26-27.
  • “Silence — And the Resurrection: A Letter from William Bross Lloyd” with “In Reply” by Max Eastman — pp. 30-32.
  • “From Norman Hapgood” [letter of June 18, 1918] with “John Reed Explains” by John Reed — pp. 32-34.

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Issue No. 7, September, 1918
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  • “With Gene Debs on the Fourth” — John Reed — pp. 7-9.
  • “Lenin — A Statesman of the New Order” [part 1] — Max Eastman — pp. 10-13.
  • “New York and I” [poem] — Arturo Giovannitti — pp. 14-15.
  • “Were You Ever a Child: A Discussion of Education” [part 2] — Floyd Dell — pp. 15-17.
  • “The Social Revolution in Court” [IWW trial] — Art Young and John Reed — pp. 20-28.

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Issue No. 8, October, 1918
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  • “The Farmers’ Crusade: Letters from George Cronyn, a Non-Partisan League Organizer” — pp. 5-12.
  • “A Suffrage Trial in Washington” — Lucy Burns — pp. 19-20.
  • “Brest-Litovsk: A Brigand’s Peace” — Nikolai Lenin — pp. 22-23.
  • “Lenin — A Statesman of the New Order” [part 2] — Max Eastman — pp. 28-33.
  • “Were You Ever a Child: A Discussion of Education” [part 3] — Floyd Dell — pp. 36-39.
  • Socialist Party Congressional Platform — pp. 42-45.

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Issue No. 9, November, 1918
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  • “The Trial of Eugene Debs” — Max Eastman — pp. 5-12.
  • “On Intervention in Russia” — John Reed — pp. 14-17.
  • “To Nicolai Lenin” [poem] — Max Eastman — pg. 17.
  • “Were You Ever a Child: A Discussion of Education” [part 4] — Floyd Dell — pp. 20-24.
  • “Pro-German” [letter to The New Republic] — William Bross Lloyd — pg. 25.
  • A Symposium on the Creel Documents — pp. 28-29.
  • “The Structure of the Soviet State” — John Reed — pp. 32-38.

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Issue No. 10, December, 1918
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  • “The Seventh Tier Soviet” — Roger N. Baldwin — pp. 10-11.
  • “The War Labor Board” — “H.M.” — pp. 12-15.
  • “The Italian Workers and the War” — Carlo Tresca — pp. 19-21.
  • “November Seventh, 1918: A Speech in Commemoration of the Founding of the Soviet Republic in Russia” — Max Eastman — pp. 22-23.
  • “Recent Impressions of Russia: Verbatim Report of a Conversation with Albert Rhys Williams” — Rose Pastor Stokes and Graham Stokes — pp. 24-33.
  • “Russia’s Answer to the Charge of Terrorism” — Chicherin — pp. 34-35.
  • “About the Second Masses Trial” — John Reed — pp. 36-38.
  • “The Election Gains of the Nonpartisan League” — Olive S. Morris — pp. 38-40.

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1918 Liberator Pamphlets:


1919

Jump to The Liberator for: 1918 | 1919 | 1920 | 1921 | 1922 | 1923


 

Issue No. 11, January, 1919
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  • “A Letter to American Workingmen” [edited] — Nikolai Lenin — pp. 8-12.
  • “What Are You Doing Out There?” — Floyd Dell — pp. 14-15.
  • “How Soviet Russia Conquered Imperial Germany” — John Reed — pp. 16-23.
  • “Demobilizing the Trade Unions” — “H.M.” — pp. 28-32.
  • “Note from the Russian Government to President Wilson” — Chicherin — pp. 38-41.

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Issue No. 12, February, 1919
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  • “The Socialist Party on Trial” — William Bross Lloyd — pp. 10-13.
  • “The Silent Defense in Sacramento” [IWW Trial] — Jean Sterling — pp. 15-17.
  • “Who’s Who in the German Revolution?” — German newspaper reporter — pp. 18-21.
  • “Making the World Safe for a Sick Idea” — Charles W. Wood — pp. 22-24.
  • “The Latest from Russia” — John Reed — pp. 24-25.
  • “Great Bolshevik Conspiracy!” — John Reed — pg. 32.
  • “Our Own Black Hundred” — John Reed — pg. 32.

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Issue No. 13, March, 1919
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  • “The Hour of the People Has Come” — Klara Zetkin, Rosa Luxemburg, Karl Liebknecht, Franz Mehring — pg. 3.
  • “Bob Minor and the Bolsheviki” — Max Eastman — pp. 5-6.
  • “Lenin and Wilson” [fiction] — Max Eastman — pg. 8-11.
  • “The Senate of the Dead” [poem] — Arturo Giovannitti — pp. 12-14.
  • “Liebknecht Dead” — John Reed — pp. 16-18.
  • “The Mooney Congress” — Crystal Eastman — pp. 19-24.
  • “The Peace that Passeth Away” [fiction] — John Reed — pp. 25-31.
  • “Ireland and the British Elections” — Hannah Sheehy Skeffington — pp. 32-34.
  • “The Truth About Breshkovsky” — “X.” — pp. 36-37.
  • “The Why, Wherefore and Whenas of Prohibition” — Charles W. Wood — pp. 40-42.
  • “Darkness Before Dawn” [Review of The Labor Movement in Japan by Sen Katayama] — John Reed — pp. 44-45.

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Issue No. 14, April, 1919
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  • “A Message from Debs” [March 11, 1919 letter] — Eugene V. Debs — pg. 3.
  • “Scott Nearing Reprieves Democracy” — Arturo Giovannitti — pp. 5-7.
  • “Beating Prohibition to It” — Floyd Dell — pp. 15-18.
  • “Are Russian Women ‘Nationalized’?” — Louise Bryant — pp. 20-21.
  • “Prinkipo and After” — John Reed — pp. 21-22.
  • “When is a Revolution Not a Revolution: Reflections on the Seattle General Strike by a Woman Who Was There” — pp. 23-25.
  • “Ten Days that Shook the League of Nations” — Floyd Dell — pp. 29-31.
  • “The Soviet of the Far East: Verbatim Report of a Conversation with Gertrude M. Tobinson, Wife of Krasnochokov, President of the Far Eastern Soviet in Siberia” — pp. 32-36.
  • “Can the Workers Run the World” — James Peter Warbasse — pg. 37.

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Issue No. 15, May, 1919
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  • “The Liars poem” by Carl Sandburg pg. 8
  • “The Invincible I.W.W.” pg. 9
  • “News from Siberia” pg. 12
  • “Mannerheim (from Our Special Correspondent in Eurpoe)” pg. 13
  • “ The Death Train of Siberia” pg. 19
  • “Education Under the Bolsheviks” pg. 14
  • “Translation from report” by Lunacharsky pg.
  • “In Memory of Jessie Ashley” pg. 28
  • “The Blessings of Militarism” pg. 29
  • “Six brilliant and still-current frames of cartoons” by Gropper pg. 31
  • “The Eighth Day” by Arturo Giovannitti pg. 32
  • “The Lawrence Strike” pg. 35
  • “Feminism” pg. 37
  • “Robert Minor in Russia” pg. 38
  • “Bolshevism – What it is Not” by John Reed pg. 39

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Issue No. 16, June, 1919
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  • “Follow Us” — Maxim Gorky — pg. 3.
  • “May Day in Ft. Leavenworth” —
  • “A Socialist C.O.” — pg. 20.
  • “Art Under the Bolsheviks: From Documentary Reports, Decrees, and Plans of the Soviet State” — Floyd Dell — pp. 11-18.
  • “Is Mexico in Danger?” — John Kenneth Turner — pp. 19-21.
  • “The Tide Flows East” — John Reed — pp. 27-29.
  • “His Majesty’s Government Writes History” — “X” — pp. 33-44.
  • “Austria Waits for the Harvest” — Hiram K. Moderwell — pp. 45-47.
  • “Personalities at Berne” — Hiram K. Moderwell — pg. 47.

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Issue No. 17, July: IWW Convention issue
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  • “A Message from Hungary to the American Workingmen” — Bela Kun — pg. 9.
  • “The IWW Convention” — Mary Marcy — pp. 10-12.
  • “Count Karolyi Tells Why” — Hiram K. Moderwell — pg. 13-16.
  • “Revolutionary Socialism in France” — Fredeick R. Kuh — pp. 18-19.
  • “Sonnets and Songs” [poetry] — Claude McKay — pp. 20-21.
  • “Religion Under the Bolsheviks” — “X.” — pp. 21-24.
  • “The New International” — Max Eastman — pp. 28-35.
  • “The Winnipeg Strike” — Frances Fenwick Williams — pp. 39-44.

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Issue No. 18, August, 1919
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  • “In Communist Hungary” — Crystal Eastman — pp. 5-10.
  • “The Convention of the Dead” [AF of L] — John Reed — pp. 12-20.
  • “The Sparticide Insurrection” [part 1] — Robert Minor — pp. 22-25.
  • “Conversations with Lenin” — Arthur Ransome — pp. 31-35.
  • “May Day in Paris” — “An American” — pp. 41-46.
  • “Negro Poems” [poetry] — Claude McKay — pg. 46.

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Issue No. 19, September, 1919
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  • “To Our American Comrades of the Railroads from the President of the British Railroad Workers” — C.T. Cramp — pg. 8.
  • “To the American Workers, the General Transport Workers of All Grades and Sections in Particular, from the Secretary of the British Transport Workers” — Robert Williams — pg. 9.
  • “The Blood of Munich” — Hiram K. Moderwell — pp. 10-19.
  • “All About It: Art Young in Washington” — Art Young — pp. 20-23.
  • “Blocking the General Strike” [Paris] — Lewis Gannett — pg. 24.
  • “British Labor is Moving” — Crystal Eastman — pp. 28-30.
  • “The Sparticide Insurrection” [part 2] — Robert Minor — pp. 31-39.
  • “The U.S. Revolutionary Training Institute” [Leavenworth] — H. Austin Simmons — pp. 42-44.

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Issue No. 20, October, 1919
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  • “A Statement and a Challenge” — Nicolai Lenin — pg. 3.
  • “The Chicago Conventions” — Max Eastman, drawings by Art Young — pp. 5-19.
  • “Class War in Italy” — Hiram K. Moderwell — pp. 20-23.
  • “S-s-s-s-h!” [Lusk Committee] — Max Eastman — pg. 24.
  • “The Workers of the Clyde” — Crystal Eastman — pp. 28-33.
  • “The Lesson of the Actors’ Strike” — Max Eastman — pp. 35-40.
  • “A Message from Bulgaria” — Ivan Vassilev Vodenitcharov — pp. 41-42.

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** THERE WAS NO ISSUE FOR NOVEMBER 1919 **

 

Issue No. 21, December, 1919
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  • “A Middle Aged Professor in Moscow” — W.T. Goode — pg. 3.
  • “Pittsburgh or Petrograd?” — Floyd Dell — pp. 5-10.
  • “Leftward Ho!” [Account of Congress of British TUC] — Walter G. Fuller — pp. 11-14.
  • “A Message from Smillie” — Robert Smillie — pp. 16-17.
  • “Back from Siberia” — Frances Fenwick Williams — pp. 18-20.
  • “G.B.S. at Home” [George Bernard Shaw] — Robert L. Wolf — pp. 22-23.
  • “A Declaration of Intellectual Independence” — Romain Rolland — pg. 23.
  • “A Letter to Romain Rolland” — Max Eastman — pp. 24-25.
  • “I Got Arrested a Little” — Robert Minor — pp. 28-38.

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1919 Liberator Pamphlet:


 


1920

Jump to The Liberator for: 1918 | 1919 | 1920 | 1921 | 1922 | 1923

 

Issue No. 22, January, 1920
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  • “Russia Victorious: Verbatim Report of a Conversation with Isaac McBride” — pp. 3-14.
  • “The Steel Strike” — Mary Heaton Vorse — pp. 16-19.
  • “The New Wild West” [Centralia] — pp. 21-23.
  • “Well, What About Mexico?” — Irwin Granich [Mike Gold] — pp. 24-38.
  • “Inquisition” — M.A. Stolar — pp. 29-30.
  • “Bogalusa” — Mary White Ovington — pp. 31-33.
  • “Hope Revives in Hungary” — Frederick Kuh — pp. 37-39.
  • “The Presumption of Innocence — in Kansas” — Winthrop D. Lane — pg. 39.
  • “Practical Feminism” [Labor Party Convention] — Crystal Eastman — pg. 40.

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Issue No. 23, February, 1920
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  • “Examples of ‘Americanism’” — Max Eastman — pp. 13-16.
  • “Murder in Centralia” — J.T. Doran — pp. 16-18.
  • “Counter Revolution in Advance: A Summary of Recent German History” — “A historian who was present during the events” — pp. 22-25.
  • “‘Solidarity! Serenity! Audacity!’: An Account of the Italian Situation” — Hiram K. Moderwell — pp. 28-37.

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Issue 24, March, 1920
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  • “Communism on Trial” — Arturo Giovannitti — pp. 5-8.
  • “An Interview with Bela Kun” — Frederick Kuh — pp. 16-21.
  • “The Communist Ambassador” [L.C.A.K. Martens] — Robert L. Wolf — pp. 28-32.
  • “Dissolving the Duma at Albany” — Robert Minor — pp. 34-39.
  • “Mexico Again” [letter of John Kenneth Turner] and reply by Irwin Granich [Michael Gold] — pp. 40-41.
  • “Robert Lansing Explains Bolshevism” — Max Eastman — pp. 42-46.

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Issue No. 25, April, 1920
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  • “The Log of the Transport Buford” — Alexander Berkman — pp. 9-12.
  • “Fear in the Jury Box” [Centralia] — John Nicholas Beffel — pg. 13.
  • “A Psycho-Analytical Confession” [Soviet Russia] — Floyd Dell — pp. 15-19.
  • “Malatesta in Italy” — Carlo Tresca — pp. 22-24.
  • “In Portugal” — John Dos Passos — pg. 25.
  • “A Yankee Convention” [Cooperative Congress] — Robert Minor — pp. 28-34.
  • “The Clarté Movement” — Max Eastman — pp. 40-42.

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Issue No. 26, May, 1920
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  • “Democracy and Revolution” [part 1] — Bertrand Russell — pp. 10-14.
  • “On Lenin’s Birthday” [poem] — Arturo Giovannitti — pg. 15.
  • “Guilty by Inference” [Winitsky Trial] — Floyd Dell — pp. 17-19.
  • “The Great Flop” [IWW-related] — Robert Minor — pp. 20-22.

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Issue No. 27, June, 1920
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  • “Palmer and the Outlaws” — Robert Minor — pp. 5-12.
  • “Jim Larkin Goes to Jail” — Louise Bryant — pp. 13-16.
  • “Why Copper is Red” — William F. Dunne — pg. 17-20.
  • “Self-Determination of Nations: A Speech” — Nikolai Lenin — pp. 21-22.
  • “Democracy and Revolution” [part 2] — Bertrand Russell — pp. 23-25.

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Issue No. 28, July 1920
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  • “The Mexican Revolution” — Carleton Beals and Robert Haberman — pp. 5-11.
  • “Caesar and Spartacus” [Germany] — Hiram K. Moderwell — pp. 14-21.
  • “The Socialist Party Convention” — Crystal Eastman — pp. 24-29.
  • “In the Shell of the Old” [ACW Convention] — Michael Gold, drawings by Robert Minor — pp. 30-34.
  • “Fellow Criminals!” — Floyd Dell — pp. 35-41.
  • “England and the White Terror” — Frederick Kuh — pp. 43-44.
  • “Our Debs” [review of Debs: His Authorized Life and Letters by David Karsner] — Floyd Dell — pp. 45-50.

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Issue 29: August 1920
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  • “The Wars of West Virginia” — Robert Minor — pp. 7-13.
  • “Robert Williams Sees Russia” — Robert Williams — pp. 14-15.
  • “Italy Tests Her Strength” — Paul DeMott — pp. 15-16.
  • “Anarchists and Others in Russia” — Griffin Barry — pp. 17-21.
  • “Putting Theories Into Practice” [Italy] — Hiram K. Moderwell — pp. 24-25.

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Issue 30: September 1920
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  • “Nietzsche, Plato and Bertrand Russell” — Max Eastman — pp. 5-10.
  • “Guilty: The General Strike” [CLP Trial] — H. Austin Simons — pp. 12-15.
  • “The Democratic Convention” — Charles Erskine Scott Wood — pp. 25-26.
  • “‘Communism But’” [Bertrand Russell] — Floyd Dell — pp. 27-29.

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Issue 31: October 1920
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  • “I Change My Mind a Little” — Robert Minor — pp. 5-13.
  • “Rosa Luxemburg to Sonia Liebknecht” [prison letter of Dec. 1917] — pp. 12-13. “‘Now That You’ve Got the Vote’” — Floyd Dell — pp. 14-16.
  • “Under Two Flags” [Italian radicals in New York] — Michael Gold — pp. 17-19.
  • “Mexican Labor and the Mexican Government” — Carleton Beals and Robert Haberman — pp. 20-23.
  • “New Soviets for Old” — Floyd Dell — pp. 25-27.
  • “Farmer Strikers in Spain” — John Dos Passos — pp. 28-30.

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Issue 32: November 1920
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  • “In Praise of Lenin” — Maxim Gorky — pp. 5-7.
  • “About Dogmatism” — Max Eastman — pg. 8.
  • “Answer to My Critics” — Robert Minor — pp. 8-11 (microfilm defective)
  • “Communist Factories in Italy” — unsigned — pp. 12-14.
  • “Back Home in Russia” — unsigned — pp. 15-21.
  • “Hillquit Excommunicates the Soviet” — Max Eastman — pp. 22-25.

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Issue 33: December 1920
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  • “John Reed” — Max Eastman — pp. 5-6.
  • “Soviet Russia Now” — John Reed — pp. 9-12.
  • “The Outlaws At It Again” [Pennsylvania coal] — Robert Minor — pp. 12-17.
  • “Science on Trial” [Ruthenberg-Ferguson Trial] — Max Eastman — pp. 20-21.
  • “Now We Can Begin” [Women’s Suffrage] — Crystal Eastman — pp. 23-24.
  • “Palmer’s Last Crime” — Art Shields — pp. 24-26.

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1921

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Issue 34: January 1921
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  • “Twenty Years” [IWW] — Mary Heaton Vorse — pp. 10-12.
  • “Soviet Russia Now” — John Reed — pp. 14-17.
  • “Hillquit Repeats His Error” — Max Eastman — pp. 20-24.
  • “Announcement” [of resignation as co-editor] — Max Eastman — pg. 24.

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Issue 35: February 1921
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  • “Locked Out” [ACW] — Mary Heaton Vorse — pp. 5-8.
  • “Last Days With John Reed: A Letter From Louise Bryant” — pp. 11-14.
  • “On Duty in Russia: A Letter from Boris Reinstein” — pp. 16-17.
  • “Toward Proletarian Art” — Irwin Granich [Mike Gold] — pp. 20-22.

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Issue 36: March 1921
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  • “One Dead — Two in Danger” [Sacco-Vanzetti] — Robert Minor — pp. 9-10.
  • “A Little Bit of Millenium” [Stelton, NJ commune] — Michael Gold — pp. 12-15.
  • “The Split in Italy” — Norman Matson — pp. 16-21.
  • “Wilson’s Style” — Max Eastman — pp. 24-27.

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Issue 37: April 1921
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  • “Foster” [editorial] — Max Eastman — pp. 5-6.
  • “Alice Paul’s Convention” [Woman’s Party] — Crystal Eastman — pp. 9-10.
  • “Bill Haywood, Communist” — Max Eastman — pp. 13-14.
  • “The Class Duel in Spain” — Carleton Beals — pp. 16-21.
  • “The Story of Alex Howat” — James P. Cannon — pp. 25-28.

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Issue 38: May 1921
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  • “Dogmatism Again” [polemic with Robert Dell on Soviet Russia] — Max Eastman — pp. 5-8.
  • “The International of Patience” [Vienna] — Frederick Kuh, with drawings by Gergel — pp. 12-15.
  • “The Beleaguered Amalgamated” — Arturo Giovannitti — pp. 16-20.
  • “The Red Army in the Near East” — “Our Special Correspondent” — pp. 21-24.
  • “Georgia Saves Her Reputation: An Eyewitnesses’ Impression of the Peonage Murder Trial” — Esau Jones — pg. 24.

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Issue 39: June 1921
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  • “Clarifying the Light” [Clarté group] — Max Eastman — pp. 5-7.
  • “The Triple Alliance Backs Down” — Charles T. Hallihan — pp. 9-12.
  • “Communist Jail-Keepers” — Louise Bryant — pp. 12-14.
  • “The Seamen’s Strike” — Winthrop D. Lane — pp. 15-16.
  • “How Black Sees Green and Red” [Sinn Fein] — Claude McKay — pp. 17-21.
  • “The Children of White Hungary” — unsigned — pg. 21.
  • “We Who Stay” [poem] — Rose Pastor Stokes — pp. 22-23.
  • “The Muscovite Steam-Roller” — “Our Special Correspondent” — pp. 24-26.
  • “Preliminary Skirmishes in Italy” — Norman Matson — pp. 28-29.

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Issue 40: July 1921
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  • “Personal Testimony” [IWW] — John L. Murphy — pg. 7.
  • “Marriage and Freedom” [part 1] — Floyd Dell — pp. 16-21.
  • “‘Guns, Bombs and Benzine’” [Italy] — Normat Matson — pp. 22-24.
  • “In Memory” [poem] — Louise Bryant — pg. 24.
  • “Tulsa — Oklahoma”— Harry Salpeter — pp. 25-26.
  • “The Siege is Lifted” [ACW] — Arturo Giovannitti — pp. 27-29.
  • “More News from Nowhere” — Michael Gold — pp. 30-32

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Issue 41: August 1921
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  • “Poems” — Claude McKay — pp. 10-11.
  • “Booze and Gompers Über Alles!” [AF of L] — Luigi Antonini — pp. 13-15.
  • “Marriage and Freedom” [part 2] — Floyd Dell — pp. 16-21.
  • “The Socialist Pin-Wheel” [convention] — “Our Special Correspondent” — pp. 22-24.

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Issue 42: September 1921
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  • “Bill Haywood in Moscow” — Lewis Gannett — pp. 11-12.
  • “The Anarchists of Italy” — Norman Matson — pp. 22-24.
  • “Freedom in Mexico” — Frank Seaman — pg. 25.
  • “The Inside of the Clothing Business” — Charles W. Wood — pp. 26-27.

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Issue 43: October 1921
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  • “An Opinion on Tactics” — Max Eastman — pp. 5-6.
  • “French Labor and Moscow” — Norman Matson — pp. 8-10.
  • “The Parliament of Man” [Moscow] — Agnes Smedley — pp. 13-15.
  • “The Battle of Logan County” [West Virginia miners] — Art Shields — pp. 16-21.
  • “Marriage and Freedom” [part 3] — Floyd Dell — pp. 22-26.
  • “In Defense of Clarté” [letter] — Henri Barbusse — pg. 30.

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Issue 44: November 1921
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  • “The American Famine” — Michael Gold, drawings by Hugo Gellart — pp. 5-11.
  • “The First Woman of Russia” [Krupskaia] — Louise Bryant — pp. 20-21.
  • “Would You Like to Be a Child?” — Floyd Dell — pp. 22-24.
  • “The History of Five Years” — William Gropper — pg. 25.
  • “Wanted: A Religious Revival” — Charles W. Wood — pp. 26-28.

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Issue 45: December 1921
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  • “A Response” [to critics of “An Opinion on Tactics”] — Max Eastman — pp. 6-9.
  • “Who Will Help the Liberator?” [emergency appeal of editors] — pg. 7.
  • “Four Sonnets” [poetry] — Claude McKay — pg. 9.
  • “Hope for America” [IWW] — Michael Gold — pg. 14-17.
  • “The House of the Dead” — Albert Rhys Williams — pp. 20-22.
  • “A Negro Extravaganza” — Claude McKay, drawings by Hugo Gellart — pp. 24-26.

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1922

Jump to The Liberator for: 1918 | 1919 | 1920 | 1921 | 1922 | 1923

 

 

Issue 46: January 1922 (not scanned yet — NYPL MICROFILM COPY BADLY DAMAGED)

Note: First issue with editorials not written by Max Eastman; Eastman off masthead. Next group of issues seem to have been edited by Mike Gold and skew heavily literary.

 

Issue 47: February 1922 (not scanned yet — NYPL MICROFILM COPY BADLY DAMAGED)

 

Issue 48: March 1922 (not scanned yet — NYPL MICROFILM COPY BADLY DAMAGED)

 

Issue 49: April 1922 (not scanned yet — NYPL MICROFILM COPY BADLY DAMAGED)

 

Issue 50: May 1922

 

Issue 51: June 1922

 

Issue 52: July 1922

 

Issue 53: August 1922 (not scanned yet — NYPL MICROFILM COPY BADLY DAMAGED)

 

Issue 54: September: Engaged (PDF) 1922 (not scanned yet — NYPL MICROFILM COPY BADLY DAMAGED) Last issue with extremely heavy literary (as opposed to political) content.

  • “The Jesus-Thinkers” — Michael Gold — pp. 11-12.
  • “Dogs and Shadows in Japan” — Gertrude Haessler — pp. 14-21.
  • “For the Silent Defenders” [IWW] — Art Shields — pp. 22-23.

 

Issue 55: October 1922 (not scanned yet — NYPL MICROFILM COPY BADLY DAMAGED) Last Issue Listing Floyd Dell as “Executive Editor” on masthead.

 

Issue 56: Nov.-Dec. 1922 (not scanned yet — NYPL MICROFILM COPY BADLY DAMAGED) Lists Robert Minor and Joseph Freeman as “Executive Editors” on masthead. Clear CP content.

 


1923

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Issue 57: January 1923: The Skirmish in Cleveland (PDF)

  • “The Red Cock” [art in Soviet Russia] — Alexander Chramoff — pp. 7-8.
  • “The Skirmish in Cleveland” [CPPA Convention] — C.E. Ruthenberg — pp. 9-11.
  • “British Labor Advances” — R.W. Postgate — pp. 12-13.
  • “The Throne of the United States” [American empire] — Robert Minor — pp. 19-27.
  • “Litany of the Revolution” [poem] — Arturo Giovannitti — pp. 29-31.
  • “Fascismo” [Italy] — G. Cannata — pp. 32-33.

 

Issue 58: February 1923

 

Issue 59: March 1923

 

Issue 60: April 1923

 

Issue 61: May 1923

 

Issue 62: June 1923

 

Issue 63: July 1923

 

Issue 64: August 1923

September 1923: The Third American Revolution (PDF)

 

Issue 66: October 1923

 

Issue 67: November 1923

 

Issue 68: December 1923

 

1924

Issue 69: January 1923

Issue 70: February 1923

Issue 71: March 1924

Issue 72: April 1924

Issue 73: May 1924 Note: misnumbered as No. 74 in print.

Issue 74: June 1924

Issue 75: July 1924

Issue 76: August 1924

Issue 77: September 1924

Issue 78: October 1924